A Veterinary Physiotherapist must be able to assess an animal for evidence of pain (acute and chronic) and the resulting physical and psychological compensatory mechanisms prior to applying physical therapy. Once the underlying issues have been established and after veterinary consultation, the therapist must be able to demonstrate skill in number of modalities. This module allows the student to implement a range of modalities as part of a therapeutic programme and implement a remedial exercise programme top complete rehabilitation.

This module covers a number of rehabilitation therapies which include hydrotherapy, sports taping, pole work and other rehabilitation exercises and includes the use, in a remedial situation, of manual and electrical modalities studied in the Therapeutic Intervention module. Each student must go through the process of planning, designing and implementing a remedial exercise programme with the help and guidance of experienced tutors who are currently working in industry. Practical application of clinical reasoning will take place where small group of students will evaluate and rehabilitate a horse. Experienced lecturers/practitioners also discuss discipline specific injuries that may be encountered for rehabilitation.

This module draws together many of the skills that have been taught in previous modules and also builds on professional skills that are required for practice in the industry. For the horse, there will be discussion and evaluation on the importance of saddle fitting, farriery, nutrition, behaviour and the impact of the rider. With the use of analytical equipment such as the Tekscan saddle pad and the mechanical horse to demonstrate how saddle fitting and rider position may have an impact on the body balance and posture of the horse. Equally importantly for the dog, the use of gait evaluation aids are intrinsic to assessment and rehabilitation.
Development of a business plan will enable students to prepare themselves to successfully manage and market themselves within the industry. This is a double module which will involve time spent with NAVP practitioners in a clinical setting using college facilities; additionally time spent in industry with Veterinary Physiotherapists will consolidate practical skills. The module takes the student forward to integrate business, academic and professional skills to help produce a well-rounded practitioner who on successful completion of the Postgraduate Diploma allows application for membership of the National Association of Veterinary Physiotherapists (NAVP).

This module draws together many of the skills that have been taught in previous modules and also builds on professional skills that are required for practise in the industry. For the horse, there will be discussion and evaluation on the importance of saddle fitting, farriery, nutrition, behaviour and the impact of the rider. With the use of analytical equipment such as the Tekscan saddle pad and the mechanical horse to demonstrate how saddle fitting and rider position may have an impact on the body balance and posture of the horse. Equally importantly for the dog, the use of gait evaluation aids are intrinsic to assessment and rehabilitation.

Development of a business plan will enable students to prepare themselves to successfully manage and market themselves within the industry. This is a double module which will involve time spent with NAVP practitioners in a clinical setting using college facilities; additionally time spent in industry with Veterinary Physiotherapists will consolidate practical skills. The module takes the student forward to integrate business, academic and professional skills to help produce a well-rounded practitioner who on successful completion of the Postgraduate Diploma allows application for membership of the National Association of Veterinary Physiotherapists (NAVP).

This module revisits the important factors relating to animal movement and integrates the functional aspects of correct movement and changes that occur due to injury and disease. This module builds on the foundation modules of functional anatomy, animals in motion and animal health science and takes the student through into level 7 study to evaluate discipline specific injuries and musculoskeletal disease.

To meet the requirements of the MVetPhys Veterinary Physiotherapy and MSc Veterinary Physiotherapy all clinical assessments on the course must be passed. In this module this consists of 3 x observed structured clinical exams and a practical competency log.

To meet the requirements of the MSc Veterinary Physiotherapy all practical assessments on the course must be passed. In this module this consists of an objective structured practical exam.

To undertake the rehabilitation process it is critical that students understand what may go wrong at molecular, cellular and tissue level. This module develops the links between the phases of repair and the optimum stage for different types of passive and dynamic rehabilitation to maximise recovery through timely intervention. Tendon and ligament injuries, muscle injury and disease, bone fractures and diseases and neurological diseases/injuries will also be addressed in this module. The physiological basis of pain mechanisms and dealing with pain through the use of analgesics will also be investigated. 

Veterinary Physiotherapists must be able to assess an animal for evidence of pain (acute and chronic) and the resulting physical and psychological compensatory mechanisms prior to applying physical therapy. These may display as gait alterations, adapted behavior which may include temperament and habit changes. There may also be changes in eating behavior. Once the underlying issues have been established and after veterinary consultation, the therapist must be able to demonstrate skill in number of modalities. This module takes the student through important assessment strategies and manual therapies such as range of motion, massage, stretching and graded mobilisations, trigger point therapy and myofascial release. Evidence of competence must also be demonstrated in a range of electrotherapies to maximize functional recovery as part of a treatment plan. Competence in the mechanisms of action and settings of a variety of modalities such as laser, ultrasound, pulsed magnetic field therapy, H wave therapy, Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) and Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation (NMES) are important to enhance recovery.

This important module covers a number of rehabilitation therapies which include hydrotherapy, using swimming, water treadmills and spa sessions, also enables the students to show competence in a range of manual cryotherapy and its application in a variety of situations. Equine and canine sports taping will be used to enhance range of motion, assist in limiting atrophy and provide afferent sensory stimulation.
Proprioceptive training exercises such as pole work, wobble boards and other rehabilitation exercises will be evaluated and used in a number of therapeutic situations. The use of manual and electrical modalities studied in the previous module will be applied in context alongside these other important techniques. Clinical reasoning skills will be brought into play where students will give initial evaluation of both dogs and horses. They will then go on to work through the process of planning, designing and implementing a remedial exercise programme with the help and guidance of experienced tutors who are currently working in industry. Experienced lecturers/National Association of Veterinary Physiotherapist practitioners also discuss discipline specific injuries that may be encountered for rehabilitation.

This module supports students in the preparation and submission of a Masters Stage Dissertation or Project worth 60 credits involving 40 weeks of student commitment (for part-time students), presented in a form appropriate to the field of study and reflecting the length and complexity of the investigation. A conventional, largely textual dissertation will contain a maximum of 15,000 words. Other formats will draw relevant conclusions or achieve an alternative synthesis from the research process by, e.g., producing a report, a piece of software or a work of art/designs/project and will evaluate both the process and outcomes of the investigation/enquiry either within the context of a written report or through an appropriate commentary.

This module supports students in the preparation and submission of a Masters Stage Dissertation or Project worth 60 credits involving a high level of student commitment, presented in a form appropriate to the field of study and reflecting the length and complexity of the investigation. A conventional, largely textual dissertation will contain a maximum of 15,000 words. Other formats will draw relevant conclusions or achieve an alternative synthesis from the research process by, e.g., producing a report, a piece of software or a work of art/designs/project and will evaluate both the process and outcomes of the investigation/enquiry either within the context of a written report or through an appropriate commentary.