This module will introduce students to various ways of writing about art and design: journalistic, literary, academic (and other).

At the end of it students will be able to recognize a number of key styles and registers and understand and begin to deploy appropriate aims and approaches for various genres in their own writing.

Additionally the unit will refine the writing skills introduced at level 4.

This module is the culmination of all the contextual modules. The role of theoretical frameworks and approaches to work will be studied and the student will need to make choices about their own approach.  The student will negotiate with their tutor the focus for a theoretically rich study that will support their art/design practice.  They will research that topic, supporting their investigation with an appropriate framework and methodology, in order to construct a fully argued extended essay.

This module focuses on the underlying anatomy and physiology that regulates behaviour. Students will review the biology of the nervous, sensory and endocrine systems. This knowledge will then be applied to how horses behave in both their natural and artificial environments and the implications for how we train them. The module will investigate which parts of the brain are involved in regulating different types of behaviour as well as the neurotransmitters responsible for initiating or inhibiting different behaviours, including stereotypic behaviours. How the horse sees, hears and feels will all impact on how the horse responds to training. It is very easy to just look at it from a human perspective but this module will encourage students to think about the impact of how the horse senses its environment on how it responds to training. The endocrine system affects both social and reproductive behaviour as well as being involved in the flight response. This module provides a great opportunity for students to relate what is happening at the biological level to how the horse responds. A range of activities including practical sessions, dissections, group discussions and lectures, will support learning on this module.

The Design Dissertation is designed specifically for Landscape and Garden Design, Landscape Architecture, and Garden Design, Restoration and Management students. It enables students from each discipline to gain experience in research by undertaking a substantive project exploring specific issues relevant to each course and their own interests in landscape. The dissertation is designed to develop independent learning, self-reliance, work planning skills and a professional approach to study and work. Design students develop their understanding of their degree subject
specialism through a project that responds to social, cultural, economic, historical and landscape/architectural contexts relevant to their chosen site and field of research. They consider the importance of biodiversity, ecological and sustainable approaches to design through site analysis and other evaluative processes. Students apply the results of their investigative research to a landscape design project through to a fully resolved design project which will synthesise contextual, theoretical or conceptual ideas and develop their communication and presentation skills to produce a portfolio of high standard drawings and models expressing their design ideas.

This module explores the natural behaviour of the horse in a free-ranging environment, looking at their social organization, maintenance, sexual and developmental behaviours, motivational priorities and examining the impact of domestic managements systems on these natural behavioural patterns. Students will explore how horses interact with one another through various means of communication and examine in particular the effects of these methods on the horse-human relationship in day to day activities, including handling and ridden procedures. Students will learn how to analyse the different situations leading to aggressive, agonistic and affiliative displays of behaviour, and whether horses are displaying dominant, submissive or neutral gestures. In-depth study of how common husbandry procedures and management regimes can lead to unwanted behaviours will also be discussed.

This module involves the delivery of content that allows assessment of the following SEBC module:
3. Understanding Equine Social Behaviour

This module offers an applied understanding of the procedures involved in the development, production, postharvest handling and market presentation of cut flowers, foliage and ornamental pot plants. The scope of the international trade in florals will be examined; procedures involved in the selection and breeding of ornamentals evaluated, the role of plant physiological processes in relation to commercial plant production, and the interaction between these and crop quality discussed.Two Stars

This module examines the need for planned landscape development in order to develop areas coherently, as well as protect sensitive areas from inappropriate development. This will include study of the objectives of planned development, influencing factors, policies and the authorities involved. The mechanisms of the planning system will be discussed.Three Stars

This module addresses the responsibilities, duties and services of a landscape design consultant. Studio seminar sessions and guest speakers share real life scenarios and ethical approaches to develop a knowledge and understanding of professionalism and professional relationships. Working with clients and other professionals is explored and considered in relation to the management of a design practice and the procedures required to successfully administrator and manage contracts. This knowledge is applied at project commencement, pre-contract stage and during contract implementation.

The Landscape Urbanism module introduces contemporary landscape architecture topics or issues relating to the urban condition. This encompasses local and regional scales, social and ecological systems, water sensitive design and place and identity relationships. Students investigate complex issues relating to the design of urban places and extend their knowledge, comprehension, evaluation and application of design theories.  Seminars, tutorials, and workshops will provide the student with the theoretical knowledge and applied methods to understand and critically assess a given project. This assessment and critique underpins the process of developing concepts and proposals to improve and refine built projects.

The module examines the close relationship between the arts, culture, and landscape and garden design through history to the present day. There is reference to land art, environmental and ephemeral art, and sculpture, along with the performing arts. An emphasis on current trends in the work of both artists and designers is placed within the context of the historic affording students an understanding of the relationship between the arts and contemporary landscape design. The transference of ideas from one medium to another will be explored alongside the interpretation of ideas.
Working on site with various communities is evaluated and students develop creative skills while adopting a selfreflective approach to working artistically with landscape and with others.

Animals are kept in large numbers throughout the UK as companions, as performance athletes and for commercial production. Their correct management requires a knowledge and understanding of the husbandry skills and practices associated with each species. The module will acquaint all students with the needs of a wide range of companion animal species; with the specific requirements of sport horses and equine breeding stock and with the performance parameters of commercial farm livestock.Four Stars

A holding course for VP students on the Principles of Animal Management course.

This module takes Professional and Creative Focus 2  as its starting point and builds on and elaborates that work through further practice and an expectation of greater subtlty and effectiveness.   The module contains the second culminating public exhibition of the course and with the students having assembled a folio of work of a professional standard and having submitted at the least  one piece of work to juried or selective outcomes.

This studio module develops knowledge, understanding, and evaluation of the issues related to the planning and design of publicly accessible landscape spaces. Public landscapes must accommodate intersecting natural and ecological processes and social, cultural, and recreational programmes that can be sometimes complementary but may be at odds. Site-specific projects will provide the vehicle to build on intellectual and theoretical approaches to site planning and design that are firmly grounded in local and regional context.Under development

This module equips students with skills that will be used in their final design project and for working successfully within the industry.
Students are introduced to the methodologies of research as applied to design and how to write a design proposal. The importance of strategic planning is considered in landscape design, as well as health and safety, risk assessment, sustainability, project management and costing and the role of external organisations. Also, the various professional pathways are considered in relation to garden design, landscape design and garden restoration and management.
Students develop and refine their 3D CAD skills and learn how to use advanced 3D presentation and visualisation software. They develop knowledge of integrating different software packages to produce a professional portfolio of images. They are encouraged to research and experiment with software and participate in the learning of the peer group.

Once again the cycle of reflection evaluation planning and execution will not differ on the surface from what has happened in previous years. However the student (artist, designer) led nature of the work they will be doing at this point will place much greater demands on their ability to pinpoint areas of deficit and to mobilise the resources necessary to overcome these. The module will run alongside the final preparations for the graduating exhibition in semester B  and hence will model the structured, self directed, pattern of reflection and work which will be required to function in a professional or higher level study context and thus act as a template for life after the course.

This module addresses two fields of study that increasingly define the contemporary practice of interior architecture and design: the adaptive reuse or re-modelling of buildings and Narrative space. The module presents continuity with the Design Studio 1 in Level 4, through the progression to a more specific engagement with the building within an interior architecture and design context.

In Narrative Space we will explore expressive areas of spatial design such as exhibitions, museums/galleries, film and television, events or collaboration with other creative disciplines. At one scale this may involve working on the building’s interior, considering elements of the immediate environment when inhabiting a space such as planning, surfaces, materials, lighting and furnishings. At another scale this will involve proposing structural interventions to the interior and exterior of the building, considering building construction and interior detailing, as well as wider social and environmental issues.

In Adaptive re-use, analysis of the context goes beyond the immediate exterior/interior physical attributes of the building and its surrounding environment requiring an empathic reading and sensitive response that brings out its innate character in the adaptive reuse proposal. Students are encouraged to develop a sense of the responsibilities placed on architects and designers though the consideration of the issues surrounding: community, user groups, demographics, and sustainability. The focus is on narrative spaces that may be within an adaptive reuse programme or in the public realm where similar agendas are applicable

This is an opportunity for students to practice the cycle of reflection and making work that will be central to the run up to their final exhibition. The fact that it is not that very final cycle allows them to consolidate all they have learned so far and to take artistic risks they might wish to eschew in the pressured environment of the final show. Although as always there is an emphasis on increasing student self-direction the module is still to an extent scaffolded by staff. For all students this module will set the tone and start to pin down the content of their final show drawing on and informed by theoretical investigations; for most students the work they make here will be of a standard that makes it potentially capable of inclusion in that show; for a small minority it will be a sharp lesson in the focus and commitment necessary in their final months of the course and an opportunity to reset their compasses.

The theoretical dimension of this work will be provided by the substantial piece of written work students will be working on and completing in Art and Design Contexts 3.

This module represents the culmination of all the creative activity carried out on the course.

It attempts to replicate real world conditions and put to the test the artistic independence, judgement and ability to assess the resources and effort required to carry out tasks at a professional level – the “artistic conscience”- which the student has been developing over the three years of the course.

During this module the student will conceive, plan, organise and execute a single substantial piece (or group of linked pieces) of creative work suitable for their final public exhibition.

The standard on which process and outcome are judged will be that of the professional world of art and design.

Each student will also provide comprehensive documentation in any appropriate form (including but not limited to: sketchbook, illustrated essay, video documentation, website, blog ) of all research, both theoretical and practical, of all practical experimentation including failures or abandoned approaches, and of the student’s continuing reflection upon this process.

The student will still consult with teaching staff who will offer advice and guidance but by this point largely as fellow artists.

This module has been developed to assist students in the transition from further to higher education. It aims to make students aware of the academic ethos that exists within higher education and the expectations that are placed upon the undergraduate with respect to independent learning and critical thinking. Students will evaluate their current academic skills using computer based resources and will identify ways in which they can work towards improving their skills base. They will be introduced to a range of resources addressing academic and welfare matters that will equip them for their time as an undergraduate student.Four Stars

This module allows the student to demonstrate how they can engage in the quest for knowledge about their chosen subject area beyond that offered by the curriculum provided for their course. The student is able to develop their own lines of enquiry concerning relevant subject areas in negotiation with the Module tutor. Activities may include attendance at relevant lectures, seminars or workshops provided by commercial, professional, or amateur organizations, appropriate visits, specialist interviews or the facilitation of a specific event that will enhance their own and others learning. Activities need to be underpinned by contemporary issues within the relevant literature and must align with the appropriate level of the National Qualifications Framework. Activities may be undertaken in a national or international context and could embrace activities undertaken in an external work based environment.Under development

This module allows the student to demonstrate how they can engage in the quest for knowledge about their chosen subject area beyond that offered by the curriculum provided for their course. The student is able to develop their own lines of enquiry concerning relevant subject areas in negotiation with the Module tutor. Activities may include attendance at relevant lectures, seminars or workshops provided by commercial, professional, or amateur organizations, appropriate visits, specialist interviews or the facilitation of a specific event that will enhance their own and others learning. Activities need to be underpinned by contemporary issues within the relevant literature and must align with the appropriate level of the National Qualifications Framework. Activities may be undertaken in a national or international context and could embrace activities undertaken in an external work based environment. NB: This module is designed to be studied on the basis of differing volumes and levels of credit. The maximum volume that can be achieved by an individual student will be 30 credits.Under development

This module has been developed to assist students in the transition from further to higher education. It aims to make students aware of the academic ethos that exists within higher education and the expectations that are placed upon the undergraduate with respect to independent learning and critical thinking. Students will evaluate their current academic skills using computer based resources and will identify ways in which they can work towards improving their skills base. They will be introduced to a range of resources addressing academic and welfare matters that will equip them for their time as an undergraduate student.Four Stars

This module is designed to develop analytical, technological, communication and learning skills. These will be developed in an appropriate vocational context by focusing on the key features of the industry sector(s) associated with the students’ course of study. This will include consideration of the types and characteristics of the organisations within the sector and the internal and external factors which influence their activities.
Delivery of the module aims to meet the needs of a diverse student profile and will therefore adopt a flexible approach centred around the personal development planning (PDP) process and the particular academic discipline.

The Sector Skills module is intended to provide the academic and personal skills essential for successful HE study and employment. It provides a foundation for the development of graduate level academic and professional skills later in the course.

Animal Management and Animal Science Contextualisation:
The generic academic and personal skills developed by this module will be introduced, practiced and assessed in the context of Animal Management and Animal Science. The sector specific skills and attributes developed will be informed by LANTRA - the Sector Skills body for environmental and-based industries, including Animal Care, Animal Technology and Livestock.

The Working in Sport module is designed to form part of the self-development in which the student can begin to build a career path and gain an understanding of the professional working environment either through paid employment or voluntary work.
In consultation with the teaching staff, the student is offered the opportunity to undertake a personally relevant work placement in a specific area of professional practice that relates to their own vocational aims and ambitions. This will allow them to experience one or several aspects of the sports industry and develop an appreciation of the working environment. Although all sport-related industry positions are acceptable, all of the students will be encouraged to gain as broad a range of experience as possible to improve their employability possibly during their studies and most definitely after graduation.
The students will be expected to produce a PDP plan and a subsequent reflective portfolio outlining their experiences within their placement. The PDP and embedded SWOT analysis will encourage students to identify their current strengths and weaknesses, the need for development in specific areas, and an increased understanding of the diversity of opportunities presented by the sports industry.

This module is the culmination of all of the contextual modules in this course. The student will negotiate with their tutor the focus of a theoretically-rich study that will support their own art/design practice. They will research that topic, supporting their investigation with an appropriate framework and methodology, in order to construct a fully-argued extended essay.

The assignments for this module reflects that throughout your studies on this course you are required to offer written commentary and critical appraisal of the work of other artists/designers, always with the central idea of supporting greater reflection upon your own studio work and how it might be evaluated by others.

This module will prepare you for synthesising disparate bodies of knowledge and theoretical study/research after your graduation and equally create good habits of reflection and presentation in those students whose orientation is primarily towards making work.

This module will introduce students to the variety of ways of writing about art and design: journalistic, literary and academic. Students will be able to recognise a number of key styles in analysing creative works and begin to deploy appropriate approaches for various writing genres in their own written work. Additionally, the module will refine the writing skills introduced in the first three semesters of this course.

The module will encourage not just passive recognition and understanding of different modes of writing, but will also enable students to develop, practice and receive feedback on their own writing skills in these modes, allowing the student to consider the employment opportunities associated with these different fields of writing, for example newspapers, magazines, catalogues and journals, as well as explanatory and promotional material for a range of organisations within the culture industries.

This module will begin and develop the progress already made towards increasing control over and sophistication in creative work that is independently conceived and developed by each student.

This module and its successor – Creative Practice 2B – will act as a bridge from the very structured atmosphere of the Level 4 Creative Practice modules to the increasing independence and self-sufficiency of Level 6.

Over the course of the module students will move from a diagnostic examination of a key piece of theoretical or philosophical text provided by the module leader, enabling a close analysis of how theory can inform practice and vice versa - to a piece of work of which the scope, content and execution are led by each student, with advice and support from staff.

The links between theory and practice will continue to be underlined by research on artists and / or designers with similar concerns to each student’s own practice in preparation for presenting completed pieces of creative works at the end of the semester. Further reading in support of the students’ practice will also continue as part of the Art and Design History modules.

This module will continue to develop the thinking processes necessary for work in a creative studio context through practical projects backed up by guided research into, and examination of, the practice of other artists and designer, both contemporary and historical.

The assignments will be centred on challenging students to use two media that they may not have utilised previously: sound, and the landscape itself as a material. Writtle University College is uniquely placed to assist in the second assignment, having grounds, facilities and staff that can support a multidisciplinary approach to Land Art.

The emphasis will be on the enabling possibilities of these media in order to develop and broaden a practice led by the student's own interests and concerns. The aim of these guided tasks is to: support and develop good working practice and student self-audited skill development to deepen confidence and to prepare students for a more independent approach in the Creative Practice modules at level 5.

Students will gain a practical understanding of contemporary themes in art practice that uses sound or the environment, land and public space in the widest sense as medium and subject and explore how, or if, they relate to their own practice. As with Creative Practice 1A, students will continue to develop a critical understanding of the relationship between research and practice in relation to their own work, supported by the assignments in Art & Design History 1B.

Creative Practice 1A is an introduction to the methods of studio practice that underpins contemporary culture and the module will introduce the planning, thinking and working necessary for a creative practice through the examples given by focusing on a key theme in contemporary aesthetics.

The work will be centred on two core themes in contemporary art and design: ‘identity and portraiture’, and ‘remix and appropriation’. The emphasis will be on the enabling possibilities of these themes in order to gently introduce the student to a way of working which is led by the student’s own interests and concerns and by their developing creative practice. The guided tasks aim to: inculcate good working practice, encourage skill development, build confidence and act as a starting point for student-led work.

The role of the tutor in this process is to advise and support the student and to guide them towards formulating objectives that are both ambitious and achievable and then asking the difficult question of whether they have fulfilled these.

Throughout the semester, students will collaborate to produce a partial survey of art and design through time. Each student will select an art/design movement and then both present their findings to their peers and write an essay about how it fits into the social and historical context of the period and how it developed out of what preceded it and how it influenced what came next. Students will start to use vocabularies and concepts from the history of art and design in which they compare and interpret artefacts and historic movements from different cultures and eras. Examples include: Art Nouveau, Cubism, Dada, Art Deco, Arte Povera, Happenings, Conceptual Art, Minimalism, Feminist Art, etc.

This module will build on and develop progress already made towards increasing control over and sophistication of work that is independently conceived and developed by each student.

It will offer the opportunity for a ‘dry run’ of the experience of assembling work for and showing it in an exhibition, an opportunity which will also be diagnostic of progress made to date and the path still to travel during Level 6.

In order to challenge students to think outside of set patterns of creativity, both for their own practice and to give an insight into how others may perceive their work in the build up to the public exhibition at the end of the semester, the first assignment in this module will task students with collaborating with their fellow students and create work using ideas suggested by their peers.

This module will continue the process of personal skills development begun in the first year and will include the leadership of a group task. The focus remains on the systematic development of complex skills and self-critical examination of progress against self-determined aims. On the basis of their 1st year experience, students will be more confident and independent in locating and using appropriate resources to develop skills. Equally, this independence will be more necessary as students begin to move towards a sense of themselves as individual artists/designers with distinct personal areas of interest requiring particular skill sets. Thus there will be a greater emphasis on student autonomy, skill-sharing and identifying resources to support skills development. To support confidence in self-criticality, students will engage in evaluation of their own work as well as work of their peers.

The aim of the three Personal Skills Development modules is to support students in systematically acquiring the required art and design skills and the ability to audit and evaluate the skills they possess in line with the development of their creative work. This will be evidenced by the leadership of a group task and the presentation of a portfolio of completed creative works at the end of the academic year.

In the first Personal Skills Development module students will be introduced to the means to identify a need and find the means and resources to develop what they require to fulfil their creative aims. Students will learn how to utilise staff expertise and ‘how to’ sites on the internet, as well as learning from skill-sharing and support groups with other students. They will also be able to identify areas of general student interest and negotiate with staff to deliver skills-support workshops. Some skills development might be freestanding, but much will arise out of the demands of their ongoing creative work.

This module will introduce a number of essential underpinning practices, techniques and skills for the future professional lives of artist and designers.

These will broadly divide into three parts:
• Giving students the tools for the dissemination and publicising an individual’s creative work.
• Ensuring that this work is part of dynamic dialogue with the wider world.
• Beginning the first stages of career planning.

The module will demonstrate the importance of considering not only how to achieve the best results with one’s own creative work, but ensuring that it is seen and appreciated in the best manner.

This module will evaluate the factors which determine the level and location of crop production in relation to climate and agro-economic factors, using a number of crop examples related to horticulture, agriculture and floristry. The development and changing patterns of cropping systems and production techniques will be discussed in the light of changing market requirements, environmental pressures and the need for sustainability in production.

The importance of global trade will be considered in terms of sustainability and environmental footprint; other environmental considerations such as energy consumption and use of non-renewable resources that of increasing importance to industry will be considered as part of the crop production process. Current research and trends will evaluated and likely future developments considered.

Rapid urbanisation is occurring around the world. Over half of the world’s population lives in urban areas and mega cities (above 10 million in population) are predicted by the UN to increase from the current 28 cities to 41 by 2030. This urbanisation is matched by problems of urban poverty, an inability to grow sufficient food, health issues, social exclusion, urban waste issues, poor water and air quality. Urban agriculture is seen as one means of addressing these issues. This module will critically examine a wide range of issues affecting the urban and peri-urban environment; the resiliency of food systems in light of increasing resource and energy scarcity and a changing climate will be explored together with the feasibility of urban agricultural systems. The environmental and economic aspects will be considered as well the links to wider policies on land use and health.

A combination of lectures, seminars, tutorials, and workshops will provide the student with background knowledge, theoretical and applied methods to understand and critically assess selected projects.

This module will enable students to understand the economic and political environment in which an arable or horticultural business operates and to develop a flexible, pragmatic approach to management based on strategic concepts and theories.

This module will focus on the design and development of global supply chains for perishable horticultural produce. Students will study logistics, cool chain and supply chain management trends, concepts, tools and techniques, particularly in the context of supplying UK, European and multinational retailers. The application to and implications for emerging economies and developing countries will also be examined. Visits and case studies will be central to the learning and assessment for this module.

The maintenance and modification of crop quality after harvest is an area of increasing importance to horticultural products which are notoriously perishable. This module reviews the key concepts involved in postharvest biology and technology. Postharvest deterioration is often caused by pest and disease organisms and the diagnosis of crop protection problems will be developed in this module. Increasing international trade and the restrictive legislation on the use of pesticides are challenging the conventional crop protection measures. The use of biological control and other novel control techniques will be discussed.

The maintenance and modification of crop quality after harvest is an area of increasing importance to horticultural products which are notoriously perishable. This module describes a range of grading, handling, cooling, storage and inspection systems for horticultural products postharvest. The need to investigate postharvest problems will be demonstrated and the student will be encouraged to develop their own analytical approach to solving a simulated problem. A range of different storage environments will be described and under which circumstances which is used will be discussed.